Multifactoral Genetic Disorders and Adverse Selection: Epidemiology Meets Economics

Tapadar, Pradip (2010) Multifactoral Genetic Disorders and Adverse Selection: Epidemiology Meets Economics. In: Royal Statistical Society Conference, 13-17 September 2010, Brighton, UK. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

Insurance underwriting aims to identify risk factors that stratify customers into homogeneous groups, so that appropriate premiums can be charged for each group. However, use of genetic risk factors, over which individuals have no control, is controversial. But progress in genetic research is enabling better understanding of gene-environment interactions and associated multifactorial disorders. So, private and undisclosed genetic information may allow adverse selection, as insurers can only charge an average price. Adverse selection will occur if the lowest risk group decides against purchasing insurance when their expected utility of insurance falls below a certain threshold. We explore this boundary.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Lecture)
Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics (inc Computing science)
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Mathematics Statistics and Actuarial Science > Actuarial Science
Depositing User: Pradip Tapadar
Date Deposited: 23 Nov 2011 10:42
Last Modified: 25 Nov 2011 09:22
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/28470 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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