The eolith debate, evolutionist anthropology and the Oxford connection between 1880 and 1940

Ellen, R.F. (2011) The eolith debate, evolutionist anthropology and the Oxford connection between 1880 and 1940. History and Anthropology, 22 (3). pp. 277-306. ISSN 0275-7206. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02757206.2011.595007

Abstract

The eolith debate mirrors the development and demise of evolutionist anthropology in Britain between 1880 and 1940. This paper traces the connections between some of the key protagonists in the controversy, especially those associated with the Pitt-Rivers Museum at Oxford. The evolutionist pre-occupation of early Oxford anthropology with the continuity between archaeology and ethnology is shown to be linked to an interest in the Eolithic controversy, and these concerns persisted into a second generation as evolutionism was marginalized and prehistoric archaeology matured. Although the eolith debate finally floundered in the debris of the “epistemic rupture” between the world of Victorian evolutionism and late twentieth-century anthropology, some of its technical pre-occupations—particularly in relation to what we would now call ethnographic analogies and in terms of the techniques for distinguishing artefacts from geofacts—persist and are very much current issues.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Roy Ellen
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2011 13:50
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2011 12:23
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/28115 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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