Passion, craving, and affect in online gaming: Predicting how gamers feel when playing and when prevented from playing

Stoeber, J. and Harvey, Matt and Ward, Joshua A. and Childs, Julian H. (2011) Passion, craving, and affect in online gaming: Predicting how gamers feel when playing and when prevented from playing. Personality and Individual Differences, 58 (8). pp. 991-995. ISSN 0191-8869. (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2011.08.006

Abstract

According to the Dualistic Model of Passion, two forms of passion can motivate a behavior: harmonious passion and obsessive passion. Across various life activities, studies have found that the two forms of passion show different relationships with affect, linking harmonious passion to positive affect and obsessive passion to negative affect. To investigate if this pattern also holds for online gaming, the present study investigated 160 gamers involved in playing massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMOs) and examined positive and negative affect (a) when playing and (b) when prevented from playing. In addition, the effects of general affect and craving for playing MMOs were controlled for. Results were as expected from the Dualistic Model of Passion: Harmonious passion for online gaming predicted positive affect when playing whereas obsessive passion predicted negative affect when playing and when prevented from playing. Moreover, these effects remained unchanged when general affect and craving were controlled for. With this, the present research shows that individual differences in passion for online gaming explain unique variance in gaming-related emotions. Moreover, the present findings suggests that craving is a variable that future research on positive and negative affect in online gaming should pay closer attention to.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Joachim Stoeber
Date Deposited: 04 Aug 2011 14:37
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2013 16:49
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/28054 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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