The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for opiate misusers in methadone maintenance treatment: a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

Drummond, C. and Kouimtsidis, C. and Reynolds, M. and Russell, I. and Coulton, S. and Godfrey, C. (2004) The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for opiate misusers in methadone maintenance treatment: a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. HMSO, LOndon (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

There is evidence to support the effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment (MM) from several countries, and it is increasingly applied as a treatment approach in Europe. The quality of provision of adjunctive psychosocial treatments has been shown to be important in the effectiveness of MM. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has become the leading treatment approach in a variety of psychological disorders. In contrast, relatively little research has been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness, and particularly cost effectiveness, of CBT in substance use disorders. There are several reasons to expect that CBT could make a significant impact on drug misuse and associated problems. CBT has been evaluated as an adjunct to MM. Several RCTs have been undertaken to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy in methadone maintenance treatment. The evidence from these studies, which were exclusively conducted in the US, overall support the efficacy of CBT, although the models of CBT applied varied considerably between studies. One study showed that CBT was more effective than minimal methadone treatment. However, the efficacy and cost effectiveness of CBT in MM in the UK NHS setting is unknown.

Item Type: Research report (external)
Subjects: R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2011 14:16
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2012 08:08
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/27968 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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