Imagining intergroup contact can improve intergroup attitudes

Turner, R.N. and Crisp, R.J. and Lambert, E. (2007) Imagining intergroup contact can improve intergroup attitudes. Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, 10 (4). pp. 427-441. ISSN 1368-4302. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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http://gpi.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/10/4/4...

Abstract

We investigated whether simply imagining contact with outgroup members can improve intergroup attitudes. In Experiment 1, young participants who imagined talking to an elderly person subsequently showed lower levels of intergroup bias than participants who imagined an outdoor scene. In Experiment 2, young participants who imagined talking to an elderly person subsequently showed lower levels of intergroup bias than participants who simply thought about elderly people, ruling out a priming explanation for our findings. In Experiment 3, heterosexual men who imagined talking to a homosexual man subsequently evaluated homosexual men more positively, perceived there to be greater variability among them, and experienced less intergroup anxiety compared to a control group. The effect of imagined contact on outgroup evaluations was mediated by reduced intergroup anxiety. These findings suggest that imagining intergroup contact could represent a viable alternative for reducing prejudice where actual contact between groups is impractical.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: intergroup contact; reducing prejudice
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Suzanne Duffy
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2008 09:06
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:09
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2794 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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