Health, morality, and infant feeding: British mothers' experiences of formula milk use in the early weeks

Lee, E.J. (2007) Health, morality, and infant feeding: British mothers' experiences of formula milk use in the early weeks. Sociology of Health and Illness, 29 (7). pp. 1075-1090. ISSN 0141-9889 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2007.01020.x

Abstract

The way mothers feed their babies is, internationally, the subject of research, health policy initiatives, and popular discussion, which commonly affirm the mantra 'breast is best'. On one level, this mantra reflects scientific evidence about nutrition and maternal and infant health. From a socio-cultural perspective, the pro-breastfeeding message has, however, been considered an aspect of morality, which influences maternal identity in important ways. This article explores this idea. It does so primarily by reporting and discussing some findings from a study about British mothers' experiences of using formula milk for infant feeding. The paper begins by contextualising this discussion by briefly outlining some aspects of the construction of infant feeding as a social problem in Britain, focusing in particular on the influence of 'the new paradigm of health'.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: breastfeeding; infant formula milk; morality; health
Subjects: H Social Sciences
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Social Policy
Depositing User: Suzanne Duffy
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2008 08:29
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2013 15:57
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2774 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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