The place of the eolithic controversy in the anthropology of Alfred Russel Wallace.

Ellen, R.F. (2011) The place of the eolithic controversy in the anthropology of Alfred Russel Wallace. Linnean, 27 (1). pp. 22-33. ISSN 0950-1096. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

The work of Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913: Fig.1) is justifiably well-known in relation to his contribution to the theory of evolution through natural selection, as is his general descriptive zoology. Less is known about his anthropological work, though his accounts of the ethnography of the places he visited in his travels (e.g. Wallace, 1869, 1889) are still important sources for students of language and culture, while his work on human antiquity became a major interest in the latter part of his life. In this paper I shed some light on this part of his work, particularly as this is reflected in his interactions with other scientists and antiquarians concerning the so-called ‘the eolithic controversy’.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Social and Cultural Anthropology
Depositing User: Roy Ellen
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2011 16:41
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2014 11:15
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/27599 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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