Barriers to giving

Knapp, M.R.J. and Kendall, J. (1991) Barriers to giving. Personal Social Services Research Unit (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

<p>Donations of money and time by households represent major sources of income, and support more generally, for Britain's voluntary organisations. Giving by households is not only quantitatively important, but usually affords voluntary organisations a greater degree of independence and autonomy when compared with income from government, corporate donors, charges for services, or membership dues. Moreover, giving is a valued form of participation by members of the public. It is a community used vehicle for altruism, reciprocation and collective action. <p><p><p>Although recorded levels of monetary gifts and volunteering appear to have increased over the past four decades or more, there are indications from the most recent survey evidence that giving may have plateaued or even declined. Yet public policy is placing increasing emphasis on the contributions to be made by the voluntary sector, and voluntary organisations are increasingly aware of the need to maintain, and preferably boost, the contributions to their income from charitable donations. What, then, are the factors which determine levels of giving, and what are the prospects for the 1990s? This paper examines economic aspects of charitable giving and reviews some of the slowly accumulating British evidence. It concludes with a discussion of the associated public policy issues for the 1990s and beyond.

Item Type: Research report (external)
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Personal Social Services Research Unit
Depositing User: Rosalyn Bass
Date Deposited: 21 May 2011 00:54
Last Modified: 24 Mar 2014 13:35
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/27317 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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