A comparison of sertraline versus tricyclic antidepressants in primary care. I: Efficacy and effectiveness

Forder, Julien E. and Kavanagh, Shane M. and Fenyo, Andrew J. (1995) A comparison of sertraline versus tricyclic antidepressants in primary care. I: Efficacy and effectiveness. Personal Social Services Research Unit (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

<p>This paper compares the effectiveness - in primary care settings - of treatment for depression using sertraline (an SSRI) to a range of commonly prescribed TCAs. A companion paper examines the utilisation of care services and the consequent costs. <p><p><p>A retrospective quasi-experimental design was employed. Patients commencing treatment with sertraline were matched with patients commencing treatment with TCAs on the basis of age, sex, duration and severity of depression. A valid sample of three hundred and seventy-eight patients were recruited, one hundred and ninety received sertraline and one hundred and eighty-eight received TCAS. Patients' notes and interviews with GPs were employed to ascertain the effect of treatment over a twelve month period following the commencement of medication. Thirty patients receiving serwahne switched to TCAS. Analysis was therefore conducted on the basis of intention to treat and by excluded those patients who switched medication. The main outcome measures were the duration of medication for depression and GPs' clinical global impression. <p><p><p>The treatment groups were well matched. From the third month of the study period onwards GPs' ratings of patients'<p><p>depression symptoms were more favourable for the group receiving sertraline. Furthermore, GPs rating of the change in<p><p>depression symptoms over the twelve month study period as a whole also favoured sertraline. Similar results were obtained when the analyses were conducted on the basis of intention to treat or when those patients who switched medication were excluded. Patients receiving sertraline also received medication for a much shorter period than patients receiving TCAS. Within the limitations of the study design sertraline appears to be more effective at reducing the symptoms of depression.

Item Type: Research report (external)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Personal Social Services Research Unit
Depositing User: Rosalyn Bass
Date Deposited: 21 May 2011 01:26
Last Modified: 19 May 2014 15:14
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/27303 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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