Analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy of laboratory impacts on Stardust aluminum foils: Interpreting impact crater morphology and the composition of impact residues

Kearsley, A.T. and Graham, G.A. and Burchell, M.J. and Cole, M.J. and Dainton, Z.R. and Teslich, N. and Bradley, J.P. and Chater, R.J. and Wozniakiewicz, P.A. and Spratt, J. and Jones, G. (2007) Analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy of laboratory impacts on Stardust aluminum foils: Interpreting impact crater morphology and the composition of impact residues. Meteoritics & Planetary Science , 42 (2). pp. 191-210. ISSN 1086-9379 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://arxiv.org/ftp/astro-ph/papers/0612/0612013....

Abstract

The known encounter velocity (6.1 kms(-1)) and particle incidence angle (perpendicular) between the Starchist spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild-2 fall within a range that allows simulation in laboratory light-gas gun (LGG) experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminum foil components of the Stardust collector. Buckshot of a wide size, shape, and density range of mineral, glass, polymer, and metal grains, have been fired to impact perpendicularly on samples of Stardust Al 1100 foil, tightly wrapped onto aluminum alloy plate as an analogue of foil on the spacecraft collector. We have not yet been able to produce laboratory impacts by projectiles with weak and porous aggregate structure, as may occur in some cometary dust grains. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology and its dependence on particle size and density, the pre-existing major- and trace-element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the impact residues in scanning electron microscopes, and the modification of dust chemical composition during creation of impact craters as revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. Together, these observations help to underpin the interpretation of size, density, and composition for particles impacted on the Stardust aluminum foils.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Physical Sciences > Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences
Depositing User: Maureen Cook
Date Deposited: 01 Apr 2008 08:17
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:08
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2612 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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