Stay cool, hang loose, admit nothing: Race, intergroup contact, and public-police relations

Eller, Anja and Abrams, Dominic and Viki, G. Tendayi and Imara, Dionne and Peerbux, Shafick (2007) Stay cool, hang loose, admit nothing: Race, intergroup contact, and public-police relations. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 29 (3). 213-224 . ISSN 0197-3533 . (Access to this publication is restricted)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01973530701503036

Abstract

Drawing on the contact hypothesis of Allport (1954) and Pettigrew (1998) we examined whether public-police contact, among White and Black university students in Britain, mediated between participant race and perceived racism of police and cooperation with police, respectively. Study 1 (N= 105) showed this to be the case for quality, but not quantity of contact. High-quality contact mitigated the negative effects of being Black on greater perceived racism and lower cooperation. Study 2 (N= 130) assessed a general view of police and desired closeness to police as dependent variables and investigated the moderating potential of racial identification. Higher-quality and lower quantity of contact were associated with a more positive view of police and higher desired closeness. Identification moderated the effects of race on quantity of contact, view of police, and desired closeness, with negative effects driven by high identification.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Louise Dorman
Date Deposited: 31 Mar 2008 08:06
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2014 08:19
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2609 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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