Globalisation or Regionalisation? The Strategies of the World's Largest Food and Beverage MNEs.

Filippaios, F. and Rama, R. (2008) Globalisation or Regionalisation? The Strategies of the World's Largest Food and Beverage MNEs. European Management Journal, 26 (1). pp. 59-72. ISSN 0263-2373. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.emj.2007.08.006

Abstract

Using a database comprising around 7,000 affiliates, this article analyses the geographic pattern of the world’s largest food and beverage multinational enterprises (F&B MNEs) over 1996-2000. Most of the 81 sampled F&B MNEs follow regional strategies. We find nine global firms, with 20% or more of their affiliates in three regions each but less than 50% in any of these regions. 22 companies following a bi-regional strategy, with 20% of their affiliates in each of the two regions, but less than 50% in any region; and 50 firms following a home-region strategy, with affiliates in the home-region accounting for at least 50% of their affiliates. While some MNEs could be considered as global according to their total affiliates distribution, their core business line could be regionally focused. According to ANOVA tests, global firms do not outperform other F&B MNEs; however, they tend to be larger and spread to more countries. A Pearson Chi square test and a Fisher test suggest that F&B MNEs based in different home-regions tend to follow different geographic strategies.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Food and drink multinationals; Regionalisation vs. globalisation debate; MNEs’ geographic strategies
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > International Business and Strategy
Depositing User: J. Ziya
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2010 08:21
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2012 14:30
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/25784 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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