EU-Russia Energy Relations: Aggregation and Aggravation

Hadfield, Amelia (2008) EU-Russia Energy Relations: Aggregation and Aggravation. Journal of Contemporary European Studies, 16 (2). pp. 231-248. ISSN 1478-2804. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14782800802309953

Abstract

Reliance on energy resources is inextricably linked to energy security. Whether dependent upon energy imports or exports, all states, regions and companies strive to reduce the risks associated with resource dependence by linking energy with their own security. Ensuring access to energy resources involves negotiating with a variety of external actors. As a result, energy is deeply connected to the external affairs of political and commercial actors alike. Within this terrain Russia and the EU emerge as very different energy actors. Indeed, the two are polar opposites in their ability to tackle the geo-economic asymmetry of importers and exporters, the structural unevenness in market versus governmental authority over energy resources and the geopolitical imbalances arising from differing perceptions of energy's role in foreign and security policy. This article examines the rise and fall of the EU–Russia Energy Dialogue. Launched in 2000 as a sector-specific forum with the capacity to engineer change in a host of other areas, the dialogue is now all but defunct, the victim of increased diplomatic fallout between the EU and Russia over political and energy issues. An overview of the key policy papers of the EU–Russia Energy Dialogue illustrates that the generic demands of energy security take on particularist orientations depending on the geo-economic and geopolitical circumstances of a given energy actor. Dialogue documents illustrate that the two sides ultimately understand energy security in very different ways. Now a viable component part of Russian national and foreign policy in its post-Cold War reconstruction, energy security is perceived by the EU in a rather more holistic way, and remains an unwieldy policy instrument.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: T.M.J. Vandenkendelaere
Date Deposited: 19 May 2010 13:50
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2012 12:14
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/24658 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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