Elite Conceptions of Muslim Identity from the Partition of Bengal to the Creation of Bangladesh, 1947 – 1971

Hashem, F. (2010) Elite Conceptions of Muslim Identity from the Partition of Bengal to the Creation of Bangladesh, 1947 – 1971. National Identities, 12 (1). pp. 61-79. ISSN 1460-8944. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14608940903542656

Abstract

The historic partition of Bengal in 1947 caused a shift in the composition of the Muslim and Hindu political elite who were now geographically bounded into two separate newly formed provincial states of East Pakistan and West Bengal. The aim of this article is to explore the transformation in elite conceptions of identity in East Pakistan from the post-1947 era until the creation of Bangladesh in 1971. The prevalence of two new competing elites created a great dichotomy in the way identity was conceived. The change of these elite groups fundamentally altered the view of identity that was articulated during this period.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: identity; social constructionism; Islam; homeland; elites; partition
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BL Religion
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BP Islam. Bahaism. Theosophy, etc
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2010 13:39
Last Modified: 15 Feb 2013 11:28
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/24428 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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