When mere exposure leads to less liking: The incremental threat effect in intergroup contexts

Crisp, Richard J. and Hutter, Russell R.C. and Young, Bryony (2009) When mere exposure leads to less liking: The incremental threat effect in intergroup contexts. British Journal of Psychology, 100 (1). pp. 133-149. ISSN 0007-1269. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

The full text of this publication is not available from this repository. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/000712608X318635

Abstract

In two experiments we tested the hypothesis that repeated exposure to out-group-relevant attitude objects would lead to less liking following a threat to identity. In Experiment 1 exposure to abstract artwork ostensibly created by a member of an out-group university led to more liking under baseline conditions, but not following a manipulation of threat. In Experiment 2 we observed a negative relationship between exposure and liking following threat: liking reversed the typical mere exposure effect. Reported emotion mediated the interactive effect of threat and exposure on liking. These findings illustrate how social identity threat can be experienced incrementally as a function of exposure. We discuss the findings in the context of an integration of research on exposure, identity, attitudes, and contact.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Ros Beeching
Date Deposited: 04 Apr 2010 20:17
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2014 11:22
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/23635 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):