Industrial Relations Climate, Employee Voice and Managerial Attitudes to Unions: An Australian Study

Pyman, Amanda and Holland, P. and Teicher, J. and Cooper, B. (2010) Industrial Relations Climate, Employee Voice and Managerial Attitudes to Unions: An Australian Study. British Journal of Industrial Relations, 48 (2). pp. 460-480. ISSN 0007-1080. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2009.00772.x

Abstract

This article examines how employee voice arrangements and managerial attitudes to unions shape employees' perceptions of the industrial relations climate, using data from the 2007 Australian Worker Representation and Participation Survey (AWRPS) of 1,022 employees. Controlling for a range of personal, job and workplace characteristics, regression analyses demonstrate that employees' perceptions of the industrial relations climate are more likely to be favourable if they have access to direct-only voice arrangements. Where management is perceived by employees to oppose unions (in unionized workplaces), the industrial relations climate is more likely to be reported as poor. These findings have theoretical implications, and significant practical implications for employers, employees, unions and the government.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > Industrial Relations/HRM
Depositing User: Rebecca Stevenson
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2009 11:49
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2012 13:29
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/23532 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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