Insurance in Between: A Critique of Liability Insurance and Its Principles

Mei, Todd (2007) Insurance in Between: A Critique of Liability Insurance and Its Principles. Literature and Theology, 21 (1). pp. 82-98. ISSN 0269-1205. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/litthe/frl063

Abstract

Is liability insurance simply a necessary evil in today’s climate of litigation? Or does it have greater implications beyond its social and economic remit? In this article, I argue that when the insurance policy is viewed hermeneutically as a text, its negligence-based definition of action supplants the understanding of responsibility, therefore having theological and philosophical implications. Insurance, in this sense, comes ‘in between’ humanity and its relation to others and fundamental ontological questions concerning the meaning of uncertainty and suffering.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science
K Law
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Depositing User: Todd Mei
Date Deposited: 24 Jun 2011 13:56
Last Modified: 11 Jan 2012 10:51
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/23359 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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