Heidegger and the Appropriation of Metaphysics

Mei, Todd (2009) Heidegger and the Appropriation of Metaphysics. Heythrop Journal, 50 (2). pp. 257-270. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2265.2009.00334.x

Abstract

Heidegger’s deconstruction of the history of Western metaphysics has been a major influence behind oststructural critiques of modernity as well as more apologetic attempts to maintain a dialogue with historical sources, such as Gadamer’s philosophical hermeneutics. This bifurcation has intensified the ambiguity of Heidegger’s project: was it an attempt to relinquish philosophical ties to the past or a call for a fundamental reinterpretation of them? In this article I argue the latter, focusing my analysis on Heidegger’s notions of appropriation and historicity. On the one hand, appropriation is the hermeneutical event by which ontology is reinfused into a reading of historical sources. On the other hand, historicity is the self-reflexive historical involvement by which we become aware of what contemporary, philosophical conditions necessitate this reengagement. In the end, Heidegger’s critique of metaphysics arises from this self-reflexivity. It deconstructs the prevailing misunderstandings of philosophical sources in order to allow for reinterpretation at a revivified ontological level constantly in view of the question of being.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Depositing User: Todd Mei
Date Deposited: 24 Jun 2011 14:06
Last Modified: 24 Jun 2011 14:06
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/23353 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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