Individual and society in Marx and Hegel: Beyond the communitarian critique of liberalism

Sayers, Sean (2007) Individual and society in Marx and Hegel: Beyond the communitarian critique of liberalism. Science & Society, 71 (1). pp. 84-102. ISSN 0036-8237 . (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1521/siso.2007.71.1.84

Abstract

Marx's concepts of individual and society have their roots in Hegel's philosophy. Like recent communitarian philosophers, both Marx and Hegel reject the idea that the individual is an atomic entity, an idea that runs through liberal social philosophy and classical economics. Human productive activity is essentially social. However, Marx shows that the liberal concepts of individuality and society are not simply philosophical errors; they are products and expressions of the social alienation of free market conditions. Marx's theory develops from Hegel's account of "civil society," and uses a framework of historical development similar to Hegel's. However, Marx uses the concept of alienation to criticize the liberal, communitarian and Hegelian conceptions of modern society and to envisage a form of individuality and community that lies beyond them.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages
Depositing User: Suzanne Duffy
Date Deposited: 18 Mar 2008 16:52
Last Modified: 11 Jan 2012 09:51
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2296 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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