The French Academy of Sciences As a Patron of the Medical Sciences in the Early Nineteenth Century

Crosland, Maurice P. (2009) The French Academy of Sciences As a Patron of the Medical Sciences in the Early Nineteenth Century. Annals of Science, 66 (2). pp. 247-265. ISSN 0003-3790. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00033790802292638

Abstract

In the wake of the French Revolution, the newly founded First Class of the Institute in Paris was able to make major contributions, not only to science but also to medicine. Unfortunately, the latter has hardly been appreciated. These medical contributions may be summarized as being: (1) through the interests of two of its sections, (2) through patronage and, in particular, its exceptional encouragement of one young man, Francois Magendie, (3) through the Montyon legacy, (4) through its implicit recognition of pharmacy and pharmacology. Special attention is given to the relationship of the official body of science with Magendie, the founder of experimental physiology, through a detailed study of the minutes of the meetings of the First Class (renamed the Academy of Sciences after 1816). Whereas one might have expected medical institutions to have played a significant part in the development of the medical sciences, it was the Academy of Sciences which played a leading role.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
D History General and Old World > D History (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: Suzanne Duffy
Date Deposited: 03 Sep 2009 08:08
Last Modified: 15 May 2014 13:28
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/22633 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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