The relationship between corporate-brand equity and the eco-agenda: is there evidence of legitimacy?

Haddock-Fraser, J.E. (2009) The relationship between corporate-brand equity and the eco-agenda: is there evidence of legitimacy? In: 5th International Conference of the Academy of Marketing, brand and corporate reputation special interest group, 1st-3rd September, Clare College Cambridge, UK. (Full text available)

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Abstract

Research to date considering brand equity relating to eco-behaviour has tended to concentrate at the specific product level, rather than corporate branding (e.g. Montoro-Rios, Luque-Martinez, Rodriguez-Molina, 2008). This paper will evaluate corporate perspectives on brand-name equity in relation to eco-behaviour and will clarify the value of such corporate identity amongst stakeholders. The importance of this research is that it develops a novel perspective on the issue of eco-behaviour to corporate brand equity, and will be of value to companies in determining their corporate environmental strategies. More specifically, this paper explores the legitimacy of the eco-behaviour of large (FTSE 100) corporate-brand companies by considering two questions: 1. Are brand-name companies more likely to engage in sound environmental management practices than non- brand companies, and if so in what particular aspects? 2. Can such behaviours be explained in terms of either financial and/or reputational benefit, thus enhancing corporate- brand equity?

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Depositing User: Janet Haddock-Fraser
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2011 12:35
Last Modified: 16 Dec 2011 15:33
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/22629 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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