A Method for Growth and Immobilization of Streptococcus-Faecalis Var Zymogenes in Bioreactors Containing Hollow-Fiber, Ceramic, Metallic or Glass-Fiber Membranes

Higton, G. and Ball, J. and Bunch, Alan William and Knowles, Christopher J. (1992) A Method for Growth and Immobilization of Streptococcus-Faecalis Var Zymogenes in Bioreactors Containing Hollow-Fiber, Ceramic, Metallic or Glass-Fiber Membranes. Journal of Microbiological Methods, 16 (1). pp. 1-11. ISSN 0167-7012. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

Details are given for the design, construction, operation, analysis, monitoring and control of microbial bioreactors fabricated from a variety of artificial membranes. The types of membranes used were polysulphone or glass hollow fibres and ceramic or metallic tubular constructs. Growth of Streptococcus faecalis var. zymogenes and the level of formation of the major metabolic end products (lactate and acetate) are reported for each bioreactor type. Satisfactory growth was obtained in each system. There was less end-product formation and growth in the bioreactor constructed from glass-fibres than in the other systems. The ratio of lactate:acetate produced suggested that the bacteria were growing largely in an oxygen limited environment in the matrices of all the membrane systems. Variation in the level of aeration in the feed to the polysulphone hollow-fibre and tubular ceramic bioreactors confirmed that there was poor mass transfer of gas to the dense cultures of bacteria in all the membrane matrices.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Membrane Bioreactor; Streptococcus-Faecalis Var Zymogenes
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems) > QP517 Biochemistry
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: P. Ogbuji
Date Deposited: 08 Sep 2009 06:59
Last Modified: 28 May 2014 10:39
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/22615 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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