Relationship Between Hybridoma Growth and Monoclonal-Antibody Production

Hayter, Peter M. and Kirkby, N.F. and Spier, R.E. (1992) Relationship Between Hybridoma Growth and Monoclonal-Antibody Production. Enzyme and Microbial Technology, 14 (6). pp. 454-461. ISSN 0141-0229. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0141-0229(92)90137-D

Abstract

Factors affecting cell growth and antibody production in a mouse hybridoma were investigated. Antibody was produced during the growth and decline phases of a batch culture with an increase in the specific rate of antibody production during the decline phase. The specific rate of antibody production was also increased in cells arrested by 2 mm thymidine, suggesting that cell proliferation and antibody production can be uncoupled. Reduced serum concentrations resulted in lower cell growth rates but increased antibody production rates. However, this trend was reversed in hybridomas which had been arrested by thymidine, since the highest antibody production rate was associated with high serum concentrations. Likewise, in proliferating cells, the optimum pH for antibody production (pH 6.8) was lower than the optimum pH for cell growth (pH 7.2), whereas in thymidine-blocked cells, the highest antibody production rate was at pH 7.2. High antibody production rates and product yields were also associated with low growth rates in continuous cultures. The possibility that antibody was under cell cycle control was investigated in synchronized hybridoma cultures. Antibody production occurred during G1 and G2 with a decline in the M phase and evidence of a further decline in the S phase. Thus antibody production was not restricted to the G1 and S phase in this hybridoma.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Hybridoma; Continuous Culture; Cell Cycle; Serum Ph
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems) > QP517 Biochemistry
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > Centre for Music Technology
Depositing User: P. Ogbuji
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2009 10:03
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2014 09:22
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/22510 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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