Identifying European marginal areas in the context of local sheep and goat breeds conservation: A geographic information system approach

Bertaglia, M. and Joost, S. and Joosen, J. (2007) Identifying European marginal areas in the context of local sheep and goat breeds conservation: A geographic information system approach. Agricultural Systems, 94 (3). pp. 657-670. ISSN 0308-521X. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

Local sheep and goat breeds are generally argued to be remarkably well adapted to marginal rural areas. The latter are often said to be particularly or solely suitable for extensive husbandry mostly based on small ruminants. However, many local sheep and goat breeds are presently endangered. Both conserving these breeds and maintaining an active agricultural presence in marginal areas are presently two major priorities for agricultural and rural development policy in Europe. The objective of this paper is to analyse the spatial link between the geographic distribution of traditional, locally adapted sheep and goat breeds and the relative marginality of regions. The concept of marginal areas is discussed and defined and an index of relative marginality is computed in a Geographic Information System. The index combines land use, demographic and socio-economic data. The correlation between the marginality of a region measured by the index and the geographic distribution of sheep and goat breeds is analysed using a simple logit model. The broader interest of the index as a tool for agricultural and rural development policy applications is then discussed. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: marginal areas; extensive husbandry; GIs; land use; rural development; indicators
Subjects: S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Depositing User: Stephen Holland
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 19:29
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:05
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/2142 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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