Motorcycling safety research - a review of the social and behavioral literature

Chesham, D.J. and Rutter, Derek R. and Quine, Lyn (1993) Motorcycling safety research - a review of the social and behavioral literature. Social Science & Medicine, 37 (3). pp. 419-429. ISSN 0277-9536. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0277-9536(93)90272-6

Abstract

The literature on motorcycling safety research is reviewed, and it is argued that there have been two main periods. The first, spanning the 1970's, was based on accident analysis, and the main objective was to identify and control factors that contribute to the severity of motorcycling accidents. The main concerns were to reduce head and brain injuries through safety helmets, to reduce multi-vehicle collisions through daytime use of headlamps, and to reduce drink-riding. The second period, the 1980's, shifted the emphasis of research to what might be called 'riding analysis'-that is, analysis of the process of motorcycle riding. Particular attention was paid to skills testing, training evaluation and perceived risk. Now, in the early 1990's, a third period is developing, in which the rider is seen as 'active agent'. The theoretical basis of the new research has come from the models of social psychology, and the main concern is to use riders' beliefs and attitudes about safe riding to predict their behaviour on the roads and so their accident involvement. The three periods of research are reviewed in turn, and the paper concludes with an outline of the key research issues that remain to be addressed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: safety; injury-prevention; health-psychology; attitudes
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: R.F. Xu
Date Deposited: 05 Oct 2009 15:22
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2014 15:20
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/20834 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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