Attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control as predictors of women's intentions to take hormone replacement therapy

Quine, Lyn and Rubin, Rona (1997) Attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control as predictors of women's intentions to take hormone replacement therapy. British Journal of Health Psychology, 2 (3). pp. 199-216. ISSN 1359-107X. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8287.1997.tb00536...

Abstract

Objectives. To examine women's attitudes towards the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and to predict intention to take it in a sample of 1200 women using the theory of planned behaviour (Ajzen, 1988) and a measure of similar prior behaviour. Design. The design was cross-sectional. A postal survey was carried out. Methods. Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 1200 women aged between 38 and 58 generated from the Kent Family Health Services Authority records. Questions based on the theory of planned behaviour were used to predict women's intentions to take HRT. Information was also collected about the women's sources of information on the menopause, their experience of the menopause and the time leading up to it, their general health, and their sociodemographic circumstances. Results. Analysis was carried out on the responses of the 641 women who were not yet taking and had never taken HRT. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that similar prior behaviour made a small independent contribution to the prediction of behavioural intention when entered after the components of the model. Structural equation modelling was carried out to show the paths between the variables. When age was included, similar prior behaviour was shown to influence behaviour through perceived behavioural control and attitude. Conclusions. In predicting women's intention to take HRT, the beliefs of significant others, the women's personal beliefs, their degree of confidence in their ability to carry out the behaviour and the experience of similar prior behaviour are important considerations.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: T.J. Sango
Date Deposited: 21 May 2009 12:50
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2014 15:23
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/17889 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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