Psychological attachment to the group: Cross-cultural differences in organizational identification and subjective norms as predictors of workers' turnover intentions

Abrams, Dominic and Ando, Kaori and Hinkle, Steve (1998) Psychological attachment to the group: Cross-cultural differences in organizational identification and subjective norms as predictors of workers' turnover intentions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 24 (10). pp. 1027-39. ISSN 0146-1672. (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/01461672982410001

Abstract

Two studies wed the theory of reasoned action, social identity theory, and Ashforth and Mael's work on organizational identification to predict turnover intentions in Japanese and British commercial and academic organizations. In both studies and in both countries, the authors expected and found that identification with the organization substantially and significantly predicted turnover intentions. Attitudes predicted intentions only in Study 2, and subjective norms significantly predicted intentions across both studies. The authors hypothesized that subjective norms would be a significantly stronger predictor of turnover intentions in a collectivist setting. This prediction was supported. Although social identity is strongly associated with turnover intentions across both cultures, the subjective normative aspects of group membership are significantly more strongly associated in the Japanese organizations.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: I. Ghose
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2009 18:05
Last Modified: 11 Apr 2014 08:36
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/17535 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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