Patients' action during their cardiac event: qualitative study exploring differences and modifiable factors

Ruston, Annmarie and Clayton, J. and Calnan, Michael .W. (1998) Patients' action during their cardiac event: qualitative study exploring differences and modifiable factors. British Medical Journal, 316 (7137). pp. 1060-1064. ISSN 0959-8138. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

Objectives: To explore the circumstances and factors that explain variations in response to a cardiac event and to identify potentially modifiable factors. Design: Qualitative analysis of semistructured, face to face interviews with patients admitted to two district hospitals for a cardiac event. Patients were divided into three groups according to the length of delay between onset of symptoms and calling for medical help. Subjects: 43 patients and 21 other people present at the time of the cardiac event. Patients were divided into three groups according to the length of time between onset of symptoms and seeking medical help: non-delayers (<4 h; n = 21), delayers (4-12 h; n = 12), and extended delayers (>12 h; n = 10). Main outcome measures: Decision making process, strategies for dealing with symptoms, and perception of risk and of heart attacks before the event according to delay in seeking help. Results: The illness and help seeking behaviour of informants had several components, including warning, interpretation, preliminary action, re-evaluation, and final action stages. The length of each stage was variable and depended on the extent to which informants mobilised and integrated resources into a strategy to bring their symptoms under control. There were obvious differences in informants' knowledge of the symptoms that they associated with a heart attack before the event. Non-delayers described a wider range of symptoms before their heart attack and twice as many (13) considered themselves to be potentially at risk of a heart attack compared with the other two groups. For most informants the heart attack differed considerably from their concept of a heart attack. Conclusion: The most critical factor influencing the time between onset of symptoms and calling for professional medical help is that patients and others recognise their symptoms as cardiac in origin. This study suggests that various points of intervention in the decision making process could assist symptom recognition and therefore faster access to effective treatment.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tara Puri
Date Deposited: 04 Jul 2009 12:12
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2014 11:03
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/17078 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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