UK Alcohol Treatment Trial: client-treatment matching effects

Heather, Nick and Copello, Alex and Godfrey, Christine and Orford, Jim and Raistrick, Duncan and Russell, Ian and Tober, Gillian and Slegg, Gary P. and Alwyn, Tina and Kerr, Cicely and Barrett, Clive and Kenyon, Rob and Carlyle, Kate and Gillam, Racheal and Handforth, Linda and Black, Rachel and John, Bev and Smith, Melanie and Coulton, Simon and Farrin, Amanda and Morton, Veronica and Parrott, Steve and Chalk, Pauline and Champney-Smith, Jeff and Crome, Illana and Emlyn-Jones, Rhoda and Fleming, Annette and Kahn, Ash and McBride, Andrew and Parkes, Sue and Summers, Zelda and Williams, Paul (2008) UK Alcohol Treatment Trial: client-treatment matching effects. Addiction, 103 (2). pp. 228-238. ISSN 0965-2140. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.02060.x

Abstract

Aim To test a priori hypotheses concerning client-treatment matching in the treatment of alcohol problems and to evaluate the more general hypothesis that client-treatment matching adds to the overall effectiveness of treatment. Design Pragmatic, multi-centre, randomized controlled trial (the UK Alcohol Treatment Trial: UKATT) with open follow-up at 3 months after entry and blind follow-up at 12 months. Setting Five treatment centres, comprising seven treatment sites, including National Health Service (NHS), social services and joint NHS/non-statutory facilities. Treatments Motivational enhancement therapy and social behaviour and network therapy. Measurements Matching hypotheses were tested by examining interactions between client attributes and treatment types at both 3 and 12 months follow-up using the outcome variables of percentage days abstinent, drinks per drinking day and scores on the Alcohol Problems Questionnaire and Leeds Dependence Questionnaire. Findings None of five matching hypotheses was confirmed at either follow-up point on any outcome variable. Conclusion The findings strongly support the conclusion reached in Project MATCH in the United States that client-treatment matching, at least of the kind examined, is unlikely to result in substantial improvements to the effectiveness of treatment for alcohol problems. Possible reasons for this failure to support the general matching hypothesis are discussed, as are the implications of UKATT findings for the provision of treatment for alcohol problems in the United Kingdom.

Item Type: Article
Additional information: Times Cited: 1
Uncontrolled keywords: alcohol; alcohol dependence; alcohol problems; client-treatment matching; effectiveness; MET; SBNT; treatment; UKATT
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare > HV5001 Alcohol use and miuse
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Simon Coulton
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2009 11:53
Last Modified: 01 May 2014 11:04
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16996 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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