The role of the state in skill formation: Evidence from the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan

Green, F. and Ashton, D. and James, D.C. and Sung, J. (1999) The role of the state in skill formation: Evidence from the Republic of Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan. Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 15 (1). pp. 82-96. ISSN 0266-903X. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/15.1.82

Abstract

We propose a new interpretation of the role of the state in skill formation, with reference to three East Asian newly industrialized economies. Rather than see the state as simply redressing externalities, we interpret the state as matching the supply and demand for skills in a rapidly growing economy. this role can be superior to a strategy of allowing education and training institutions to be driven by autonomous processes. The role is most likely to be observed in developmental states. We examine the political mechanisms that have helped to ensure that educational and training policy formation are subordinated to the imperatives of economic growth. While the East Asian model cannot be imported wholesale to western countries such as Britain in different historical circumstances, the example lends credence to the value of the state taking a strategic approach to education and training policy.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Economics
Depositing User: I.T. Ekpo
Date Deposited: 10 Apr 1914 00:08
Last Modified: 10 Apr 1914 00:08
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16818 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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