Self narrative framing: The effects of systematic written reflections on personal progress in 12-step facilitation therapy

Stephenson, G.M. and Haylett, S.A. (2000) Self narrative framing: The effects of systematic written reflections on personal progress in 12-step facilitation therapy. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 13 (4). pp. 313-319. ISSN 1072-0537. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10720530050130120

Abstract

Clients receiving twelve-step facilitation therapy in a residential setting were asked to complete, in the third person, a weekly evaluation of progress based on reading personal "Feelings" diaries they had written on a daily basis over a period of one week starting three weeks previously. All 12 patients who had been in treatment for four weeks prior to the intervention took part in the study. Controlled analyses of subsequent narrative content of the diaries indicated no change in focus, temporal orientation or referent, but did show a marked increase in their positivity. This was verified by a computer analysis of positive feelings words. The intervention also appeared to bring about a decrease in the consistency of feelings about personal progress. The study suggests that clients who responded positively to the intervention tended to do well in recovery.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: A. Xie
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2009 12:45
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2009 12:45
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16664 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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