Contested identities: The adoption of American Indian children and the liberal state

Slaughter, M.M. (2000) Contested identities: The adoption of American Indian children and the liberal state. Social & Legal Studies, 9 (2). pp. 227-248. ISSN 0964-6639. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/096466390000900203

Abstract

The Indian Child Welfare Act gives the tribes the power to determine the placement of Indian children. American I;Indian tribes are semi-sovereign entities which retain the power to control their internal affairs and are not constrained by the Constitution. In making child welfare determinations tribes engage in practices which in other cases would be unconstitutional: they apply group rights to trump parental interests and they determine tribal membership on the basis of criteria which are arguably racial. The Act reveals the irresolvable conflict between tribal norms and concepts of identity and those found in American liberalism.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
K Law
Depositing User: A. Xie
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2009 13:07
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2009 13:07
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16634 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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