Characterization in stand-up comedy: From Ted Ray to Billy Connolly, via Bertolt Brecht

Double, Oliver (2000) Characterization in stand-up comedy: From Ted Ray to Billy Connolly, via Bertolt Brecht. New Theatre Quarterly, 16 (64). pp. 315-323. ISSN 0266-464X. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0266464X00014068

Abstract

Stand-up comedy is often distinguished from straight acting by its apparent lack of characterization-the comedian appearing onstage apparently as him or herself. But within gags and routines, comics often briefly take on the voice and posture of the characters they describe. Here Oliver Double contrasts the approach of two comedians of different generations-Ted Ray and Billy Connolly-to this technique of 'momentary characterization.' He notes the links between Connolly's conversational approach and Brecht's notions of acting, and goes on to examine the broader questions of comic personae, representation of the self, and the changing performance conventions within British stand-up comedy.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PE English
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of English
Depositing User: P. Ogbuji
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2009 23:52
Last Modified: 16 May 2014 14:36
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16397 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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