Biodegradation of diethyl phthalate in soil by a novel pathway

Cartwright, C.D. and Owen, S.A. and Thompson, I.P. and Burns, R.G. (2000) Biodegradation of diethyl phthalate in soil by a novel pathway. Fems Microbiology Letters, 186 (1). pp. 27-34. ISSN 0378-1097. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6968.2000.tb09077...

Abstract

Biodegradation of diethyl phthalate (DEP) has been shown to occur as a series of sequential steps common to the degradation of all phthalates. Primary degradation of DEP to phthalic acid (PA) has been reported to involve the hydrolysis of each of the two diethyl chains of the phthalate to produce the monoester monoethyl phthalate (MEP) and then PA. However, in soil co-contaminated with DEP and MeOH, biodegradation of the phthalate to PA resulted in the formation of three compounds, in addition to MEP. These were characterised by gas chromatography-electron ionisation mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance as ethyl methyl phthalate, dimethyl phthalate and monomethyl phthalate, and indicated the existence of an alternative pathway for the degradation of DEP in Soil co-contaminated with MeOH. Transesterification or demethylation were proposed as the mechanisms for the formation of the three compounds, although the 7:1 ratio of H2O to MeOH means that transesterification is unlikely. (C) 2000 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: diethyl phthalate; methanol; biodegradation; demethylation; transesterification
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences > Cell & Developmental Biology Group
Depositing User: P. Ogbuji
Date Deposited: 06 Apr 2009 08:46
Last Modified: 06 Apr 2009 08:46
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16240 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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