Making the WTO ‘more supportive of development’? The Doha Round and the Political rationality of the WTO’s Development Mission

Alessandrini, Donatella (2009) Making the WTO ‘more supportive of development’? The Doha Round and the Political rationality of the WTO’s Development Mission. Law, Social Justice and Global Development Journal (1). pp. 2-17. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Abstract

This article is concerned with the Doha ‘Development’ Round of the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Its historic significance seems to lie in the fact that the international community has undertaken the unprecedented effort to deliver the long-standing development promise of the multilateral trade regime. Thus, despite its past failures, the claim is that its successful conclusion is a ‘political must’ for development. Contrary to this assumption, the paper argues that the ‘failure’ and ‘promise’ of development that the multilateral trade regime articulates are inherent in the ‘science of development’ established at the end of the colonial era. In particular, the paper claims that the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the WTO have contributed to the creation, consolidation and transformation of a development apparatus that links forms of knowledge about the so—called Third World with forms of power and intervention. By emphasising the permanence of the ‘civilising mission’ within the WTO’s Doha agenda, it makes the case for challenges to be made not only to its current market-access mindset but also to the three normative assumptions that have provided the ‘ science of development’ with its political rationality.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Science of Development, Neo-Liberal Rationality, GATT, WTO, Doha Round
Subjects: K Law
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Law School
Depositing User: Amy Parkes
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2009 11:46
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2014 11:03
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/16027 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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