Anthropology and its subdivisions in relation to contemporary human science

Ellen, Roy F. (2008) Anthropology and its subdivisions in relation to contemporary human science. Ethnologie française, 38 (4). pp. 591-595. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.3917/ethn.084.0591

Abstract

The paper argues that the formal subdivisions of anthropology, through which it is administered and taught, are less important than linkage between the different kinds of theory that they represent. It is suggested that we have reached a moment in the history of the subject, following the rejection of old stereotypes as to what constitutes “social anthropology”, and through methodological cross-fertilization between disciplines, when it is essential to re-engage with evolutionary approaches, though not to weakly imitate them.

Item Type: Article
Additional information: ISBN 978-2130566014
Uncontrolled keywords: Anthropological theory, Biological and Social Anthropology, Evolutionary approaches, Methodology.
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Roy Ellen
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2009 11:19
Last Modified: 19 May 2014 08:54
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/15834 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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