Sex Differences in the Emergence of Leadership During Competitions Within and Between Groups

Van Vugt, Mark and Spisak, Brian R. (2008) Sex Differences in the Emergence of Leadership During Competitions Within and Between Groups. Psychological Science, 19 (9). pp. 854-858. ISSN 0956-7976. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2008.02168.x

Abstract

This experiment investigated potential gender biases in the emergence of leadership in groups. Teams played a public-goods game under conditions of intra- or intergroup competition. We predicted and found a strong preference for female leaders during intragroup competition and male leaders during intergroup competition. Furthermore, during intragroup competition, a female leader was more instrumental than a male leader in raising group investments, but this pattern was reversed during intergroup competition. These findings suggest that particular group threats elicit specific gender-biased leader prototypes. We speculate about the evolutionary and cultural origins of these sex differences in the emergence of leadership.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Louise Dorman
Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2009 15:23
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2014 15:10
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/15284 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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