Plants Used in Chinese Medicine for the Treatment of Male Infertility Possess Antioxidant and Anti-Oestrogenic Activity

Tempest, Helen G. and Homa, Sheryl T. and Routledge, Edwin J. and Garner, Anthony and Zhai, Xiao-Ping and Griffin, Darren K. (2008) Plants Used in Chinese Medicine for the Treatment of Male Infertility Possess Antioxidant and Anti-Oestrogenic Activity. Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine, 54 (4-5). pp. 185-195. ISSN 1939-6368. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

The full text of this publication is not available from this repository. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

In this study Chinese herbs commonly used in the treatment of male infertility were investigated for relevant biochemical activity. Male factor infertility predominantly arises via barriers to, or defects in, spermatogenesis. The process of spermatogenesis is under strict endocrine control; in addition oxidative stress has been implicated in male infertility with significant levels of reactive oxygen species detected in 25% of infertile males. A total of 37 individual herbs and seven herb decoctions used in the treatment of male factor infertility were therefore tested for endocrine activity using a recombinant yeast based assay and antioxidant activity using the FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant potential) assay. Individual herbs tested did not show androgenic properties, 20 showed strong and 10 weak anti-oestrogenic activity (per g of dried herb tamoxifen equivalents ranged from 1.18-1280.66 mg and 0.06-0.98 mg, respectively). Oestrogenic responses were elicited for two herbs (85.30-550 g oestradiol equivalents/g dried herb), with seven and three herbs exhibiting a strong or weak anti-androgenic response (per g of dried herb DHT equivalents ranged from 1.54-66.78 mg and 0.17-0.32 mg), respectively. Of these 37 herbs, strong (15 herbs), intermediate (7 herbs) and weak/no (15 herbs) antioxidant activity was detected (ranging from 0.912-1.26; 0.6-0.88 and 0-0.468 g ascorbate equivalent/mg dried herb, respectively). The seven decoctions (previously used to treat patients) tested elicited strong (5 herbs) and weak (2 herbs) anti-oestrogenic responses (per g of dried herb tamoxifen equivalents ranged from 1.14-13.23 mg and 0.22-0.26 mg, respectively), but not oestrogenic, androgenic nor anti-androgenic, consistent with their individual composition. With regard to antioxidant activity the following responses were recorded: three strong, three intermediate and one weak (ranging from 1.02-1.2; 0.72-0.76 and 0.44 g ascorbate equivalent/mg dried herb, respectively). The prospects for introducing Chinese herbal treatments into the Western-based medicine are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: anti-oestrogen; antioxidant; FRAP; male infertility; traditional Chinese medicine
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Louise Dorman
Date Deposited: 28 Apr 2009 15:45
Last Modified: 21 May 2014 12:47
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/15262 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):