The effects of visual priming on information processing in child sexual offenders.

Keown, K. and Gannon, T.A. and Ward, T. (2008) The effects of visual priming on information processing in child sexual offenders. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 14 (2). pp. 145-159. ISSN 1355-2600. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13552600802248114

Abstract

Child sexual offenders are hypothesized to hold offence-supportive beliefs that set them apart from others. The current study seeks support for this view via a cognitive-experimental approach. Child sexual offenders and offender controls were exposed to pictures of semi-clothed children (priming condition) or clothed, mature adults (control condition). Participants then read ambiguous sentences describing children's actions that could be interpreted in a sexualized manner. Next, participants completed a surprise recognition test in which half the sentences were re-presented in an unambiguously sexual form, and half in an unambiguously non-sexual form. Contrary to hypotheses, primed and/or control child sexual offenders did not show a memory bias for sexualized sentences, suggesting that they did not interpret the original sentences in line with offence-supportive beliefs. Results raise questions about whether child sexual offenders universally hold abnormal beliefs that facilitate their offending. Results also highlight the need for further experimental research within this field.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Child sexual offenders; child molesters; beliefs; cognitive distortions; priming; information processing
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Applied Psychology
Depositing User: Theresa Gannon
Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2009 11:14
Last Modified: 06 May 2009 14:30
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/15173 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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