If syllables were classification units in speech perception, auditory priming would show it.

Dumay, Nicolas and Content, Alain and Radeau, Monique (2007) If syllables were classification units in speech perception, auditory priming would show it. In: Proceedings of the 16th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 6-10th August 2007, Saarbrucken, Germany. (Access to this publication is restricted)

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Abstract

Two auditory priming experiments tested whether the final overlap effect relies on syllabic representations. Amount of shared phonetic information and syllabic correspondence between prime and target nonwords were varied orthogonally. In the related conditions, CV.CCVC primes and targets shared the last syllable (e.g. pinclude-viclude) or the last syllable minus one phoneme (e.g. pinclude-viflude); conversely, CVC.CVC primes and targets shared the last syllable (e.g. goltibe-purtibe) or the last syllable plus one phoneme (e.g. goltibe-pultibe). Both experiments required to repeat back the targets, with Experiment 2 including foils. The facilitation induced by related primes increased with the number of shared phonemes, and was by and large independent of syllabic correspondence. There is thus little evidence for pre-lexical syllabic classification.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Uncontrolled keywords: speech perception; auditory priming; syllable; shadowing
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Nicolas Dumay
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2009 11:02
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2011 01:42
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/14925 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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