Behavioral and electrophysiological study of phonological priming between bisyllabic spoken words.

Dumay, Nicolas and Benraïss, Abdelrhani and Barriol, Brian and Colin, Cécile and Radeau, Monique and Besson, Mireille (2001) Behavioral and electrophysiological study of phonological priming between bisyllabic spoken words. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 13 (1). pp. 121-143. ISSN 0898-929X. (Access to this publication is restricted)

PDF (Peer-reviewed Research Article)
Restricted to Repository staff only
Contact us about this Publication Download (512kB)
[img]
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1162/089892901564117

Abstract

Phonological priming between bisyllabic (CV.CVC) spoken items was examined using both behavioral (reaction times, RTs) and electrophysiological (event-related potentials, ERPs) measures. Word and pseudoword targets were preceded by pseudoword primes. Different types of final phonological overlap between prime and target were compared. Critical pairs shared the last syllable, the rime or the coda, while unrelated pairs were used as controls. Participants performed a target shadowing task in Experiment 1 and a delayed lexical decision task in Experiment 2. RTs were measured in the first experiment and ERPs were recorded in the second experiment. The RT experiment was carried out under two presentation conditions. In Condition 1 both primes and targets were presented auditorily, while in Condition 2 the primes were presented visually and the targets auditorily. Priming effects were found in the unimodal condition only. RTs were fastest for syllable overlap, intermediate for rime overlap, and slowest for coda overlap and controls that did not differ from one another. ERPs were recorded under unimodal auditory presentation. ERP results showed that the amplitude of the auditory N400 component was smallest for syllable overlap, intermediate for rime overlap, and largest for coda overlap and controls that did not differ from one another. In both experiments, the priming effects were larger for word than for pseudoword targets. These results are best explained by the combined influences of nonlexical and lexical processes, and a comparison of the reported effects with those found in monosyllables suggests the involvement of rime and syllable representations.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Nicolas Dumay
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2009 22:42
Last Modified: 06 Sep 2011 01:42
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/14922 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year