Grouping for behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia: clinical and biological aspects. Consensus paper of the European Alzheimer disease consortium

Robert, Philippe H. and Verhey, Frans R. J. and Byrne, E. Jane and Hurt, Catherine and De Deyn, Peter Paul and Nobili, Flavio and Riello, Roberta and Rodriguez, Guido and Frisoni, Giovanni B. and Tsolaki, Magda and Kyriazopoulou, Nora and Bullock, Roger A. and Burns, Alistair and Vellas, Bruno (2005) Grouping for behavioral and psychological symptoms in dementia: clinical and biological aspects. Consensus paper of the European Alzheimer disease consortium. European Psychiatry, 20 (7). pp. 490-496. ISSN 0924-9338. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2004.09.031

Abstract

Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), constitute a major clinical component of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is a growing interest in BPSD as they are responsible for a large share of the suffering of patients and caregivers, and they strongly determine the patient's lifestyle and management. Better detection and understanding of these symptoms is essential to provide appropriate management. This article is a consensus produced by the behavioral group of the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium (EADC). The aim of this article is to present clinical description and biological correlates of the major behavioral and psychological symptomatology in AD. BPSD is not a unitary concept. Instead, it should be divided into several symptoms or more likely: groups of symptoms, each possibly reflecting a different prevalence, course over time, biological correlate and psychosocial determinants. There is some clinical evidence for clusters within groups of BPSD. Biological studies indicate that patients with AD and BPSD are associated with variations in the pathological features (atrophy, brain perfusion/metabolism, histopathology) when compared to people with AD without BPSD. An individually tailored approach taking all these aspects into account is warranted as it may offer more, and better, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment opportunities.

Item Type: Article
Additional information: IN FILE
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: Faculties > Science Technology and Medical Studies > Kent Institute of Medicine and Health Sciences (KIMHS)
Depositing User: M.P. Stone
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2008 17:03
Last Modified: 23 Apr 2014 14:15
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/12262 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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