Feeding dragons in Komodo National Park: a tourism tool with conservation implications

Walpole, Matthew J. (2001) Feeding dragons in Komodo National Park: a tourism tool with conservation implications. Animal Conservation, 4 (1). pp. 67-73. ISSN 1367-9430. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S136794300100107X

Abstract

Large carnivores are key visitor attractions in protected areas, but are difficult to see. Thus, supplementary feeding is sometimes used to attract them to viewing sites. Such intervention is contentious but its effects have rarely been examined. This paper analyses a case study of supplementary feeding in Komodo National Park, Indonesia. Using data from daily and annual Komodo dragon censuses, feeding records and financial accounts, the effects of feeding and its cessation on dragon numbers, tourist viewing opportunities and local community benefits were examined. Regular feeding caused dragon numbers to increase at the feeding site, but not year-round. Cessation of feeding caused numbers to decline again to natural levels. However, tourists were less likely to see dragons at the feeding site after cessation, and local community revenues declined with the loss of a market for goats. Solutions lie in finding less intrusive means for tourists to view dragons, and enabling local people to become involved in tourism through training, recruitment and the development of alternative markets.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: C.G.W.G. van-de-Benderskum
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2008 15:22
Last Modified: 11 Jun 2014 10:03
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/10732 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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