Jack Tar and the gentleman officer; the role of uniform in shaping the class and gender-related identities of British naval personnel, 1930-1939

Colville, Quintin (2003) Jack Tar and the gentleman officer; the role of uniform in shaping the class and gender-related identities of British naval personnel, 1930-1939. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 13 (XIII). pp. 105-129. ISSN 0080-4401. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0080440103000057

Abstract

Rather than examining the navy as a professional fighting organisation, this essay approaches the institution as one in which a range of masculine identities and lifestyles were constructed. From this perspective, its focus is on the material culture of naval uniform, and the function of uniform in defining and communicating particular understandings of class and masculinity. It demonstrates that the respective uniforms of various ranks associated their wearers with specific clusters of stereotyped socio-cultural qualities and characteristics, and indeed with substantially different incarnations of masculinity. The essay also relates the design of naval uniform to much wider class- and gender-related debates within British society during the period.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D204 Modern History
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: L.J. Brown
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2007 18:42
Last Modified: 28 Apr 2014 15:10
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/1067 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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