Culture and Indigenous Knowledge Systems: Emergent Order and the Internal Regulation of Shared Symbolic Systems

Fischer, M.D. (2005) Culture and Indigenous Knowledge Systems: Emergent Order and the Internal Regulation of Shared Symbolic Systems. Cybernetics and Systems, 36 (8). pp. 735-752. ISSN 0196-9722. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

The full text of this publication is not available from this repository. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

I explore the relationship between culture, knowledge and behaviour in a context of change, comparing scientific with cultural knowledge. I argue that applications (or instantiations) of scientific knowledge are not the same as science, and undergo a process that has properties not unlike those described by Ellen and Harris for 'Indigenous Knowledge' (IK). This process uses knowledge that is not derived from the system represented, but nevertheless is necessary for the system to operate in a contingent world even though this knowledge was not in the original subset of knowledge being applied. This consideration of knowledge about what contexts must be instantiated to enable domain knowledge to be instantiated builds on Ellen's concept of prehension, which in part includes the anticipatory knowledge a subject brings to a situation. I suggest the operative principles in IK have similar properties.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Social and Cultural Anthropology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Visual and Computational Anthropology
Depositing User: C.G.W.G. van-de-Benderskum
Date Deposited: 04 Oct 2008 10:42
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:40
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/10446 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):