Special issue on the dynamics of strategy.

Phillips, P.A. (2003) Special issue on the dynamics of strategy. Journal of Business Research, 56 (2). pp. 93-94. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/S0148-2963(01)00281-...

Abstract

This issue follows on from the previous special issue of the Journal of Business Research (Vol. 47, No. 1), containing a selection of papers from the Second Conference on the Dynamics of Strategy devoted to strategy under dynamic change. This special issue presents a selection of papers from the Third and Fourth International Conferences on the Dynamics of Strategy held at the Surrey European Management School, University of Surrey. The eight papers chosen represent the top four papers selected by both programme committees. The Third and Fourth Conferences on the Dynamics of Strategy included papers making important scholarly contributions in areas pertaining to the conference themes. Keynote presentations at the Third Conference were given by Georg von Krogh (University of St. Gallen), Max Boisot (ESADE), Gerry Johnson (Cranfield School of Management) and George Thomason (University of Wales). Papers selected for this issue were initially selected on the basis of abstracts, and then the papers were double blind refereed by the programme committee. Members included Roger Bradburn (American College of London), Jaz Gill (University of Bradford), Peter Kangis (University of Surrey), Jonathan Klein (University of Southampton), Dolores O'Reilly (University of Ulster), Stuart Sanderson (University of Bradford), Jim Slater (University of Birmingham) and Robin Wensley (Warwick University). Keynote presentations at the Fouth Conference were given by Harvey Thompson (IBM), Andrew Pettigrew (Warwick University), Kees van der Heijden (Strathclyde University), Prabhu Guptara (Union Bank of Switzerland), George McKenzie (University of Southampton) and Seija Kulkki (Helsinki School of Economics). Once again, papers selected for this issue were initially selected on the basis of abstracts, then the papers were double blind refereed by the programme committee. Members included Roger Bradburn (American College of London), Stephen Carter (University of Derby), Stephen Christie (University of Surrey), Simon Croom (Warwick University), David Edgar (University of Glasgow), Alan Fowler (University of Newcastle), Audley Genus (Brunel University), Jaz Gill (University of Bradford), Richard Hall (Durham University), Keith Horton (Napier University), Brian Hunt (Imperial College), Jonathan Klein (University of Southampton), Dolores O'Reilly (University of Ulster), Philip Powell (Goldsmith College), Diane Rulke (Cranfield School of Management), Bob Ryan (Royal Holloway School of Management), Clive Savory (De Montfort University), Jim Slater (University of Birmingham), Eberhard Stickel (Universitaet Viaina), Georg von Krogh (University of St. Gallen), Kim Warren (London Business School) and Robin Wensley (Warwick University). The eight papers chosen represent the top four papers selected by both programme committees. Papers selected can be grouped into three categories. The first group looks at performance issues relating to: intangible resources and strategic orientation, strategies in a dynamic marketplace and the determinants of business success under hypo capitalism. The second group looks at strategy practice and the dynamics of power, optimising strategic information systems development and systems modelling simulation and the dynamics of strategy. The third group contains papers, which consider managing knowledge associated with innovation, and evolutionary concepts and business economics. Camelo-Ordaz, Martin-Alcazar and Valle-Cabrera adopting a resource and capability view of the firm examines the influence of certain internal and external variables on the strategic choices and orientation of companies. They find evidence that companies compete on the basis mainly of superior product/service innovation and marketing capacities show a prospector-type strategic orientation. However, the relationship between analyser and defender archetypal strategies was less pronounced. Kangis and O'Reilly compare strategies of two airlines in the context of the Irish aviation industry. One airline has adopted a focus on core activities and the other on value added strategies. The result from their analysis leads to some interesting conclusions. For example, where an important external stimulus (liberation) disturbs the existing status quo, this creates a strategic opportunity for a new entrant to get a toehold. They then cite examples of other markets where liberalisation has lead to new start up low cost-no frills airlines. Hunter examines the strategies adopted by selected firms in the posttransformation economy in Russia. The exploratory study sought to discover if the uncertainty of the hypo capitalistic environment produced a common strategic reaction in successful firms and also if it was possible to discover and label the reactions. The results revealed that successful firms displayed a variety of business strategies, and the common strategy was diversification. Horton argues that the notion of strategy in general and information systems strategy, in particular, is fundamentally concerned with mechanisms of power. He asserts that much of the literature that has been presented regarding the practice of strategy with respect to information systems has not adequately explored the concept of power. Wainwright, Reynolds and Argument propose an optimisation model to aid the formulation of information system strategy. The model is particularly suited to small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), who need to balance long-term investment against the risk of short-term expenditure. Fowler considers the tools of system thinking and simulation as a framework for managing the complex and dynamic process of strategy formulation, evaluation and implementation. In conclusion, it is postulated that competitive advantage and survivability skills can potentially be achieved through a process of organisational learning, which, in turn, leads to an enhanced ability to adapt quickly and successfully in complex, unstable environments. In an empirical study looking at managing knowledge associated with innovation, Hall and Aniani use a technique which aims to operationalise the concepts of: tacit and explicit knowledge, radical and incremental innovation, communities of knowledge and the five basic knowledge transformation processes: externalisation, dissemination, internalisation, socialisation and discontinuous learning. Four benefits are identified. Release of trapped personal/tacit knowledge, knowledge gaps and the management of risks, productive dialogue and messages for management. Powell and Wakeley argue that a “new” subdiscipline of business economics is steadily evolving where the aim of its contributors is to produce useful insights into the nature of the firm and its competitive environment, which in turn inform the practices of strategic management. The paper concludes by identifying a number of normative strategic management responses (complementary to conventional strategic thinking), dawing upon three essential elements of evolutionary systems (variety generation, fitness testing and retention) to characterise these responses.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > International Business and Strategy
Depositing User: Paul Phillips
Date Deposited: 18 Oct 2008 16:38
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:39
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/10300 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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