Should conservationists pay more attention to corruption?

Smith, R.J. and Walpole, M.J. (2005) Should conservationists pay more attention to corruption? Oryx, 39 (3). pp. 251-256. ISSN 0030-6053. (The full text of this publication is not available from this repository)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605305000608

Abstract

Corruption is known to limit economic development and fuel poverty, but it may also hinder conservation efforts and contribute to biodiversity loss. Here we explore some of the ways that corruption may affect conservation. We argue that corruption has potentially significant implications that should be highlighted and tackled directly. Unfortunately, research into the topic lags behind that in other sectors and empirical studies are scarce and underdeveloped. The result is that, whilst some academics and practitioners cite corruption as a threat to biodiversity and call for efforts to increase transparency and accountability, we currently know little regarding the nature and magnitude of any effects it may have. Whilst precautionary measures can be built into conservation projects to pre-empt corruption, further research would help to shed light on this issue and aid the development of appropriate responses.

Item Type: Article
Additional information: 961GG Times Cited:6 Cited References Count:58
Uncontrolled keywords: biodiversity conservation corruption governance mitigation strategies luangwa valley biodiversity indonesia decline growth enforcement governance investment trends zambia
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: C.G.W.G. van-de-Benderskum
Date Deposited: 27 Oct 2008 22:36
Last Modified: 14 Jan 2010 14:38
Resource URI: http://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/10075 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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